XI CANARY ISLANDS WINTER SCHOOL OF ASTROPHYSICS

"GALAXIES AT HIGH REDSHIFT"

Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias
Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Tenerife, Canary Islands (Spain)
November 15th - 26th, 1999

Programme

Understanding the high-redshift Universe using quasar absorption lines
Prof. Dr. Jill Bechtold, Univ. of Arizona, USA

Stellar population synthesis models at low and high redshift
Prof. Dr. Gustavo Bruzual, CIDA, Venezuela

High-redshift galaxies in the HDF and elsewhere
Prof. Dr. Mark Dickinson, Space Telescope Science Institute, USA

Galaxy formation and evolution: recent progress
Prof. Dr. Richard Ellis, Univ. of Cambridge, U.K.

Star formation in galaxies: the FIR and submm view
Prof. Dr. Alberto Franceschini, Univ. of Padova, Italy

Galaxy formation and evolution: clues in the local Universe
Prof. Dr. Ken Freeman, Mt. Stromlo Observatory, Australia

High-redshift radio galaxies
Prof. Dr. Steve Rawlings, Univ. of Oxford, U.K.

Analytical and numerical models of galaxy formation
Prof.Dr. Simon White, MPI für Astrophysik, Germany
 


Understanding the high-redshift Universe using quasar absorption lines
Prof. Dr. Jill Bechtold, Univ. of Arizona, USA

  1. Introduction, historical overview, basic formalism in interpretation of quasar spectra.
  2. The Lyman alpha Forest, and intergalactic medium: observations and theoretical modeling. Cosmology with quasar absorbers.
  3. The ISM in galaxies at z>1: Damped lyman alpha absorbers. Chemical evolution, star formation history, and kinematics of high redshift galaxies.
  4. ISM in Galaxies and IGM at z<1.
  5. Molecules: Search for molecular emission and absorption from galaxies. The formation of primordial molecules.


Stellar population synthesis models at low and high redshift
Prof. Dr. Gustavo Bruzual, CIDA, Venezuela

  1. Basic concepts.
  2. Model predictions.
  3. Properties of local stellar populations.
  4. Globular clusters:
  5. Isochrone fitting in the CMD.
    Spectral Energy distributions.
  6. Nearby galaxies:
  7. Spectral Energy distributions.
    Dependence on IMF, age, and metallicity.
    Dependence on dust content.
  8. Star forming galaxies.
  1. Spectral Evolution.
  1. Applications to high redshift galaxies.


High-redshift galaxies in the HDF and elsewhere
Prof. Dr. Mark Dickinson, Space Telescope Science Institute, USA

  1. How (and why) we find galaxies at z > 1.
  2. The Hubble Deep Fields: background and lessons learned.
  3. Properties of Lyman Break selected galaxies at z > 2.
  4. Near-infrared properties of high redshift galaxies.
  5. Galaxy clustering at z > 1 and miscellaneous topics.


Galaxy formation and evolution: recent progress
Prof. Dr. Richard Ellis, Univ. of Cambridge, U.K.
 

  1. The Growth of Structure.
    1. The cosmological model, dark matter, hierarchical assembly versus monolithic collapse, bias and feedback, assumptions and tests.
  2. Primaeval Galaxies.
    1. Classical searches, the history of spheroidals in clusters and the field, Lyman drop outs, emission line surveys, surveying the `Dark Ages'.
  3. Environmental Evolution through Cluster Studies.
    1. Hubble's morphological sequence, morphology-density relation, the enigmatic S0s, the Butcher-Oemler effect - infall, gas stripping and dynamical friction.
  4. Disk Galaxies
    1. Tully-Fisher relation, disk formation and angular momentum, bars, bulges and secular evolution, HST imaging.
  5. Faint Blue Galaxies - what are they?
  6. Irregulars, merger rates and future programmes.


Star formation in galaxies: the FIR and submm view
Prof. Dr. Alberto Franceschini, Univ. of Padova, Italy

  1. Effects of dust in population synthesis: the properties of galaxies at long wavelengths.
  2. Star formation in the local universe: interactions and mergers, the hyper-luminous galaxies, dynamical modelling and simulations.
  3. Confrontation with spectro-photometric data on distant galaxies selected in the FIR and SUBMM.
  4. The distant and very distant universe: the history of star-formation and metal production, constraints from the background radiation.
  5. Relationship between galaxy and quasar formation.


Galaxy formation and evolution: clues in the local Universe
Prof. Dr. Ken Freeman, Mt. Stromlo Observatory, Australia

The oldest objects in nearby galaxies formed long ago: they give insight into the chemical and dynamical conditions when the universe was young, and into the processes that were active during galaxy formation and the subsequent evolution. Also, the local universe provides a reference frame for studies of galaxies at high redshift. The lectures will discuss these general issues in the context of:


High-redshift radio galaxies
Prof. Dr. Steve Rawlings, Univ. of Oxford, U.K.

  1. Finding high-redshift radiogalaxies: radio source counts, redshift surveys and biases, filtered surveys, space densities.
  2. Radiosource physics: radio emission mechanisms, properties of radio jets, jet-related emissions at other wavelengths, the P-D diagram and physical models for the time-evolution of powerful radio sources.
  3. Truly unified schemes for radiosources: central black-hole and the jet-accretion link, orientation-based unification schemes, the alignment effect, the radio-loud/radio-quiet dichotomy.
  4. Radiosource environments: galaxies and the K-z relation, X-ray/lensing/radio depolarisation probes of environments, clustering around radio sources, clustering of radio sources.
  5. Radiosources as cosmic probes: mapping large-scale structure, determining evolution of gas and stars in elliptical galaxies, links with galaxy formation at high redshift, use in constraining cosmological parameters.


Analytical and numerical models of galaxy formation
Prof. Dr. Simon White, MPI für Astrophysik, Germany
 

  1. Outline of the "standard picture" of structure formation and summary of the evidence supporting it.  Linear theory of structure growth, nonlinear scaling laws, origin of angular momentum. Heating, cooling, enrichment and feedback -- scaling laws for the evolution of the baryonic component.
  2. Poisson solvers for large-scale simulations. Grid and particle-based hydrodynamics schemes. Setting initial conditions. "Sub-grid" models for star-formation and feedback. Strengths and weaknesses of current simulation techniques.
  3. Hierarchical growth of structure. Mass distributions, merging histories and their dependence on cosmology. Origin, evolution and parameter dependence of clustering bias.
  4. Disk galaxy models. Analytic models of disk formation and evolution. Simulations of disk galaxy formation. Relation to damped Lyman alpha absorbers. Outstanding problems.
  5. Elliptical galaxy models. Dissipational versus dissipationless models. Elliptical progenitors in a hierarchical model. Origin of fundamental plane and luminosity-metallicity correlations. Observational tests of models. Outstanding problems.