Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad Gobierno de Canarias Universidad de La Laguna CSIC Centro de Excelencia Severo Ochoa

Results Gallery

Select a year: 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 |

· More scientific highlights from this year.

Three supernova shells around a young star cluster in M33

Author/s: A. Camps Fariña, A., Beckman, J., Font, J., Borlaff, A., Zaragoza Cardiel, J., Amram, P.

Reference: 2016 MNRAS 461 L87 | Link

Upper panel: Example of a spectrum contained in the Fabry-Pérot data where we detect three pairs of emission peaks symmetrically spaced with the emission of the H ii region, which correspond to the presence of three expanding shells.Lower panel: Expansion maps showing the detection of the three shells. Each box shows the measured expansion velocity at each spatial position where the presence of that shell is detected. All the boxes show the same area centred on the studied H ii region. It is apparent that the shells are roughly concentric and clearly separated in expansion velocity. The numbering corresponds with that of the upper panel.
Upper panel: Example of a spectrum contained in the Fabry-Pérot data where we detect three pairs of emission peaks symmetrically spaced with the emission of the H ii region, which correspond to the presence of three expanding shells.Lower panel: Expansion maps showing the detection of the three shells. Each box shows the measured expansion velocity at each spatial position where the presence of that shell is detected. All the boxes show the same area centred on the studied H ii region. It is apparent that the shells are roughly concentric and clearly separated in expansion velocity. The numbering corresponds with that of the upper panel.

Using a specialized technique sensitive to the presence of expanding ionized gas, we have detected a set of three concentric expanding shells in an H ii region in the nearby spiral galaxy M33. The detection was done using Fabry-Pérot spectroscopy, which allows us to map the ionized gas emission line Hα with exceptional precision in the spatial and spectral coordinates. We also took long-slit spectra of colisionally excited emission lines, which showed that the shells are likely originated from supernova explosions.

Using the flux and the kinematics we estimated the kinetic energy in the shells, and found it to be much lower than expected if we assume an homogeneous interstellar medium. We propose that molecular clouds have survived inside the star-forming region, which would account for the discrepancy in the physical properties we measure. Upon inspecting previous works with data on the region, we find supporting information for our hypothesis, such as the region's radio emission showing the presence of supernova remnants and the detection of a giant molecular cloud adjacent to the star cluster.

We use our own cookies and cookies from a third party to gather statistical information to improve our services and our website. If you continue with the navigation, you are accepting the installation and use of these cookies. You can change the configuration of your browser not to accept the installation or you can obtain more information in our Cookie Policy.

OK