Surges and Si IV Bursts in the Solar Atmosphere: Understanding IRIS and SST Observations through RMHD Experiments

Nóbrega-Siverio, D.; Martínez-Sykora, J.; Moreno-Insertis, F.; Rouppe van der Voort, L.
Bibliographical reference

The Astrophysical Journal, Volume 850, Issue 2, article id. 153, 12 pp. (2017).

Advertised on:
12
2017
Description
Surges often appear as a result of the emergence of magnetized plasma from the solar interior. Traditionally, they are observed in chromospheric lines such as Hα 6563 \mathringA and Ca II 8542 \mathringA . However, whether there is a response to the surge appearance and evolution in the Si IV lines or, in fact, in many other transition region lines has not been studied. In this paper, we analyze a simultaneous episode of an Hα surge and a Si IV burst that occurred on 2016 September 03 in active region AR 12585. To that end, we use coordinated observations from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph and the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope. For the first time, we report emission of Si IV within the surge, finding profiles that are brighter and broader than the average. Furthermore, the brightest Si IV patches within the domain of the surge are located mainly near its footpoints. To understand the relation between the surges and the emission in transition region lines like Si IV, we have carried out 2.5D radiative MHD (RMHD) experiments of magnetic flux emergence episodes using the Bifrost code and including the nonequilibrium ionization of silicon. Through spectral synthesis, we explain several features of the observations. We show that the presence of Si IV emission patches within the surge, their location near the surge footpoints and various observed spectral features are a natural consequence of the emergence of magnetized plasma from the interior to the atmosphere and the ensuing reconnection processes.
Related projects
Solar Eruption
Numerical Simulation of Astrophysical Processes

The general aim of this project is the investigation of astrophysical processes through the use of state­of­the­art numerical codes on massively parallel computers. More specifically, the research in many astrophysical fields requires an understanding of gas dynamical, magnetic, radiative transfer and gravitational phenomena not accessible to